Unity Accessibility Plugin – Update 12 – Release Date and Anniversary

Roughly a year ago I started work on the Unity Accessibility Plugin. That doesn’t mean I have been working on it for one year – far from it. I honestly have no way of telling how many weekend and evening hours went into it. (It was a lot, though.)

Which is why I am a little excited to see that the plugin is finally so close to release!

What’s the holdup?

If you’ve followed this blog a little, you might remember that I already released a game with the plugin.

It might seem counter-intuitive, but having released a game with it doesn’t mean the plugin itself is ready for release. It’s one thing for me to use my own plugin, and another to have the plugin usable by others. It needs rigorous testing, documentation, a nice UI, demo projects and a support forum. And then everything needs to be bubble wrapped and uploaded to the Unity Asset Store.

When?

I hate disappointing people. So I won’t give an official release date. I couldn’t anyway, even if I tried.

Remember the old saying that the last 5% of a software project take 95% of the time? And I still need to do actual (I mean paid) work, too. It is impossible to predict anything with any reasonable certainty.

WHEN???

Ok, so here’s the jist.

The documentation just isn’t done. There’s not actually all that much left to do on the code before the initial release. Oh, yes, I have a long list of things on my wish list (from localization to Braille support) – but all of those are merely nice-to-have features that can wait until after release. The documentation can not.

Documentation, including at least one tutorial video, needs to be there from the start and it needs to be good.

I’m also in the process of finding a few developers that will beta test the plugin (and documentation) with their own projects. I don’t know how long that will take, either.

Sooon…ish?

So that’s where things are at and that’s why I can’t give a release date prediction. If you’re a developer, you probably understand this anyway, buy I just felt like I should explain why I am so evasive when asked for a date.

Unity Accessibility Plugin – Update 11 – Editor Accessibility vs App Accessibility

About once every month I receive an email or Twitter message asking – usually outstandingly nicely – whether my Unity Accessibility Plugin will make it possible for blind developers to create games with Unity. It’s happened often enough that I think it warrants a short post to clarify what my plugin does, and what it does not do.

On the left side is the logo of the Unity Editor, on the opposite side is the Made-With-Unity splash screen that is displayed when starting games created with Unity. They look almost identical.

So similar and yet so different.

It’s a screen reader

In a nutshell, the plugin is a screen reader, specifically tailored to work with apps and games created with Unity. Neither VoiceOver nor TalkBack can recognize the UI elements that Unity renders, so all apps created with Unity are automatically inaccessible otherwise. The important part is that the plugin makes the apps created with Unity accessible, not Unity itself.

It does not make Unity itself accessible

The Unity Editor – at least on Windows – is not very accessible to screen reader software. NVDA will read the menus and the names of the individual panels, but nothing else. JAWS apparently fares not much better. For development, this is useless. This particular plugin doesn’t change that, unfortunately.

However…

Experimental accessibility for the Editor

A few weeks ago, over Christmas, I was playing around with making the Editor itself accessible. Inspired by a blind developer who wanted to use Unity to make a Go-Fish game I started to create a plugin that adds accessibility functionality to Unity. But this project is so early in its infancy that I feel almost uncomfortable writing about it at all.

Currently, this plugin adds keyboard shortcuts to read out the errors in the console, it plays sound effects when entering or leaving game mode, and notifies the developer if the compilation fails. It let’s the developer tab through the game objects in the scene hierarchy, reading out their names, how many children they have and reads out hints on how to add new children. It also makes the project view a little more accessible, reading out the names of files and folders.

But I haven’t found any solution for managing the components on a game object. Unity’s Inspector window supports keyboard navigation, but I can’t find a way to query what is currently highlighted and focused, so that I could tell NVDA (or any other screen reader) to read it out. Managing components and their values, usually in the form of prefabs, is probably the most important core feature of Unity. That makes this a major road block at the moment

Interested in joining the project?

In a finished version I would love this plugin to allow blind developers to do as much as possible with the Editor, including the creation and management of prefabs. It should also be possible to create builds for the various target platforms. And it should include all kinds shortcuts to make the most common tasks quick to do. And I would also want it to include a stack of documentation and tutorials on how to use Unity and create games with it without sight. Then throw in a demo project or two. All neatly wrapped in a free, easy-to-download-and-install package.

I would love to see this work. But I am enough of a realist to know that I don’t have a lot of time left over to put into this – at least not while I’m still working on the other accessibility plugin. If I tried to split my time between the two, neither one would ever get finished.

For that reason, this is an open invitation to other developers willing to help with this. I’d be happy to put what I have up on Git Hub if anyone was interested in joining in.
Just contact me: michelle@metalpopgames.com