Unity Accessibility Plugin – Update 10 – A First Game

A few weekends ago I did my own personal Game Jam. The plugin is in a good place and I wanted to give it a test run.
If you have no idea what I am talking about, I recommend quickly reading the first post on this project and then come back. You can find it here.

A woman sits deeply focused at her desk, typing at her computer.

My One-Person Game Jam

I started at 7 pm, got some sugar (aka chocolate!) and some caffeine in me – and shortly after midnight I had a game up and running. It would have been sooner, but my dogs insisted that I feed them and then even demanded a walk around the neighborhood. What can I say – puppy eyes are my big weakness.

The result is an accessible Match 3 game.
Yes, you read correctly – another Match 3 game. This is a technology test, so stop moaning!

Screenshot of the puzzle game, showing a grid of different colored gems.

The world really needed another Match 3 game, didn’t it?

The game is quite simplistic without a deep story line. Or any story line, really. I wanted to test the plugin, so going for something simplistic made the most sense – and I didn’t have time for more anyway.

The plugin isn’t fully complete yet, there are a dozen small issues, and just as many missing features. Most importantly, many of the special gestures don’t work yet, like “Read From Top” or “Go Back”. But still, this is a first live action test for the plugin and I am a little excited about that!

Go check it out!

If anyone wants to see the plugin in action in its current state, please give it a go. And if you try it out, I would be grateful if you gave me your feedback. I’m not talking about a review (although I won’t stop you), I mean feedback about the navigation, the controls and the overall accessibility of everything. Just post it into a comment here or write me an email: mika@metalpopgames.com

Banner for Blindie Match Puzzle Game showing a few of the gems and the subtitle 'a fully accessible puzzle game'.

If VoiceOver or TalkBack are detected to be active, accessibility will turn on automatically. But you can turn the accessibility mode on or off with the button in the main menu.

The game is available on Android and iOS. Here are the links:

Blindie Match for iOS – (Update: Speech rate and voice issues are fixed now)

Blindie Match for Android

Note to sighted players:
If you have never before used a phone with VoiceOver or TalkBack enabled, the navigation might be a tad confusing – at least if you choose to turn on the accessibility mode. Sighted people tend to intuitively swipe into the direction that they want the UI focus to move, for example down to get to the next button in a list. This is not how screen readers work – since that wouldn’t make much sense for non-sighted people. Try swiping left and right instead, and double tap to press a button.

Why are there graphics? 

That’s a valid question.
Both the accessibility plugin’s code and actually blind players couldn’t care less whether there are beautifully animated, hand-drawn images bouncing around, or whether I just show you a blank screen. In fact, that is what I did at first.

Here is how the game actually looked that night after my game jam. Next to it is a screenshot of how it looks now.

The left picture shows the game's main menu with a light gray background and rectangular white buttons. The right picture shows the main menu with a strong purple background, and colorful round buttons in different sizes.

The game’s title was shortened from Blindie Match 3 to just Blindie Match

I spent a week cleaning up the code and adding in some minimal level of polish. The point of this plugin is not just to enable developers to make games specifically targeted at blind or sight-impaired players. It is equally supposed to give them a chance to make their regular, graphics-based games accessible. I don’t want to send the wrong message by making the first game I release with this plugin something that looks like it is actively uninviting sighted players.

Yes, I’m still a crappy artist

As you might know, I have no sense for colors or graphical design, and I can’t draw well. I’ve written about it before in a previous post. It’s OK, I like to believe I make up for my lack of skills in the graphics department by being really good at coding instead. So if you are wondering how I made the game look pretty, the answer is: I cheated. I bought a pre-made set of Match 3 graphics online. Luckily we live in an indie developer heaven, where you can buy what you can’t create yourself for very reasonable prices.